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What is DOMS?

What is DOMS?

Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a type of ultrastructural muscle injury. It manifests from eccentric or unfamiliar exercise and includes reduced force capacities, increased painful restriction of movement, stiffness, swelling, and joint dysfunction. Although DOMS is considered a mild form of injury, it is one of the most common reasons for compromised sportive performance.

Biopsy analyses of muscles have revealed ultrastructural lesions which cause further apoptosis and inflammation [8, 9].

In a recent study, healthy control subjects tested the effects of curcumin (400 mg/day) before and after participating in exercises designed to induce muscle soreness. Curcumin supplementation resulted in significantly smaller increases in local proinflammatory chemicals following exercise compared to the placebo. This may help to decrease recovery time and improve performance during subsequent exercise sessions.

Nutrient Analysis 2019

Nutrient Analysis 2019

All nutrient analysis performed and certified by Merieux Nutrisciences  (https://www.merieuxnutrisciences.com/us/en/homepage).

Ginger-Turmeric Shot:

Serving Size 25 mL - Density 1.03 g/mL

Ginger Assay USP/NF (Current Version)

  • Gingerols (mg/dose) 14.7 mg/dose
  • Gingerdiols (mg/dose) 3.32 mg/dose
  • Gingerdione (mg/dose) 0.59 mg/dose
  • Shogaols (mg/dose) 0.98 mg/dose

Total Ginger 19.6 mg/dose

Total Curcuminoids USP/NF (Current Version)

  • Curcumin (dose) 4.25 mg/dose
  • Demethoxycurcumin (dose) 1.14 mg/dose
  • bis-Demethoxycurcumin (dose) 0.606 mg/dose

Total Curcuminoids (dose) 6.00 mg/dose

Ginger-Turmeric Powder:

Recommended serving size: 1 tbsp (3.4g)

Ginger Assay USP/NF (Current Version)

  • Gingerols 11.6 mg/g
  • Gingerdiols 2.43 mg/g
  • Gingerdione 0.19 mg/g
  • Shogaols 1.6 mg/g

Total Ginger 15.8 mg/g

Total Curcuminoids USP/NF (Current Version)

  • Curcumin 13.2 mg/g
  • Demethoxycurcumin 6.4 mg/g
  • bis-Demethoxycurcumin 6.2 mg/g

Total Curcuminoids 25.8 mg/g

The Role of Inflammation in Disease

The Role of Inflammation in Disease

While not meant to be an extensive list, here's the low-down on how inflammation contributes to some major diseases.

In Cardiometabolic Disease, the role of inflammation in the early-stage pathophysiology of arterial blood clots has been recognised for over two decades. The flood of white blood cells into damaged arteries initiates a cascade of events that propagates atherosclerosis. Rupture plaques in turn cause an inflammatory response, which leads to further clots inside the blood vessels.

In Diabetes, fatty tissue enlargement is associated with immune cell infiltration, in particular that of macrophages and T cells. These cells release a host of pro-inflammatory chemicals that impede the insulin signalling cascade, leading to insulin resistance. This ultimately leads to a dysregulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in fatty tissue, skeletal muscle and liver.

In Arthritis (OA), inflammation-mediated joint pain is a major cause of morbidity in society.